Author Archives: Adam Taylor

New pups in Strathcona

What a relief for us after the hard winter in Strathcona Park! While Mike and Joey were releasing marmots, they spotted an unknown female with 2 wild born pups! The female has ear tags, but we can’t read them! But that’s alright, because all that really matters is the two wild-born pups playing on the rocks below her.  Many thanks to Joey Chrisholm, who was able to catch a picture of the mom with one the pups!

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First pups of the year spotted

UPDATE: Jordan sent these photos in of the pups! Original story below.

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And one more …

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Just in time for Canada Day, Jordan, a member of the Field Crew, spotted the first new-born pups of the year! The Crew hadn’t been able to locate Mystic this spring until Jordan spotted her with her 5 pups on June 28th.

Mystic has been all-star for the recovery of her species. Last year she had 6 pups, and now 5 again this year. For comparison, most Vancouver Island Marmots have 3 or 4 pups every other year.

Jordan took photos, and we’ll be sure to post them once she’s back from the Mountains. In meantime we’ll keep our fingers crossed that more pups are spotted as they start to emerge from their burrows in the summer!

5 Marmots Released to Mt Washington

The first of our 2016 summer releases went smoothly today (June 27th) when 5 marmots from the Calgary Zoo were released to Mt Washington.  There’s still 8 more marmots from the Calgary Zoo to be released, and a number more that will likely need to be translocated into suitable habitat, but its a great start! After the release into a nest box, the marmots are understandably a little skittish, but soon curiosity overcomes their fear, and they start to explore their new wild surroundings.  Here’s the first of today’s marmots taking in the view before fully committing to emerging from the nest box.

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Wild born marmots get names

While we and the media have been focused on the sad news from the Strathcona area recently, we also have good news to share. The field crew has been busy with yearlings on Mt Washington. These wild marmots were born last year, and there is a healthy crop of them at Mt Washington!

We give them each a name selected from our “Name-a-Pup” contest. Here are the names handed out so far this year:
– Kirby, male
– Mildred, female
– Rex, male
– Tracker, male
– Shiloh, female
– Roy, male
– Willellen, female
– Daisy, female

You can enter the “Name-a-Pup” contest by adopting a marmot. Your gifts from the Adopt-a-Marmot program enable us to do the recovery work the marmots need. Thank you!

Poor overwinter survival in Strathcona troubling

Sadly, this winter many marmots in the Strathcona region did not survive to the spring. We have lost 36 marmots, a significant percent of the population in the Strathcona region. As well, there are a number of marmots we have not been able to locate yet, and we do not know their fate.
 
We also do not yet know why there was such poor survival this winter in this one region, but we are working hard to find out. One possibility is that the summer drought last year reduced the fall foliage that marmots rely on before going into hibernation. Hopefully we will learn more in the weeks ahead.
 
While we are deeply saddened by this discovery, there is good news as well. In the Nanaimo Lakes region and at Mt Washington, marmots did quite well overwinter, which is a great relief.
 
Plus, due to monitoring efforts, we know about this decline. That gives us the opportunity to learn and respond.
 
Finally, while troubling, these deaths will not push the Vancouver Island Marmot to the brink of extinction. They are a stark reminder of work still ahead of us, and how fragile the marmots’ place in the wild remains, but it also reminds us of how far we have come over the past 13 years. 
 
Now we go work to learn what we can, and continue towards our goal of a secure place in the wild for our marmots. Despite this setback, the only reason that marmots have not become extinct is because of our generous donors.  Thank you so much for caring for this beautiful creature.  Your gifts help everyday as we rebuild the populations
Adam Taylor, Executive Director

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4 weeks ago

Marmot Recovery Foundation

Our condolences to all the conservationists working to save White Rhinos. While hope remains for the Northern White Rhinos, using techniques like in vitro fertilization, this will be a difficult day.It is with great sadness that Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the Dvůr Králové Zoo announce that Sudan, the world’s last male northern white rhino, age 45, died at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya on March 19th, 2018 (yesterday). Sudan was being treated for age-related complications that led to degenerative changes in muscles and bones combined with extensive skin wounds. His condition worsened significantly in the last 24 hours; he was unable to stand up and was suffering a great deal. The veterinary team from the Dvůr Králové Zoo, Ol Pejeta and Kenya Wildlife Service made the decision to euthanize him.

Sudan will be remembered for his unusually memorable life. In the 1970s, he escaped extinction of his kind in the wild when he was moved to Dvůr Králové Zoo. Throughout his existence, he significantly contributed to survival of his species as he sired two females. Additionally, his genetic material was collected yesterday and provides a hope for future attempts at reproduction of northern white rhinos through advanced cellular technologies. During his final years, Sudan came back to Africa and stole the heart of many with his dignity and strength.

“We on Ol Pejeta are all saddened by Sudan’s death. He was a great ambassador for his species and will be remembered for the work he did to raise awareness globally of the plight facing not only rhinos, but also the many thousands of other species facing extinction as a result of unsustainable human activity. One day, his demise will hopefully be seen as a seminal moment for conservationists world wide,” said Richard Vigne, Ol Pejeta’s CEO.

Unfortunately, Sudan’s death leaves just two female northern white rhinos on the planet; his daughter Najin and her daughter Fatu, who remain at Ol Pejeta. The only hope for the preservation of this subspecies now lies in developing in vitro fertilisation (IVF) techniques using eggs from the two remaining females, stored northern white rhino semen from males and surrogate southern white rhino females.

#SudanForever #TheLoneBachelorGone #RememberingSudan #Only2Left

photo: Andrew Harrison Brown
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1 month ago

Marmot Recovery Foundation

Tonight! Malcolm McAdie has been working with Vancouver Island Marmots for 20 years, as well on projects with Alaska Marmots, Harlequin Ducks, and Marten. If you are in Victoria, this is a a great chance to meet Malcolm and learn about our work!Want to know about the status of the Vancouver Island marmot? Wildlife vet Malcolm McAdie will tell us about his work with Marmot Recovery Fdn at #UVicENVI seminar TODAY at 11:30am, DTB B255
twitter.com/MarmotRecovery/status/948622028436721665
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