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Updates from the Team

Our first marmot rescue of the season is complete!

Late last year, we learned of a family of Vancouver Island marmots that established themselves near Knight Lake. We knew from past experience that they would not survive long low elevation, unsuitable habitat and sought to capture and relocate them. We were able to catch two pups and the father, but the mother and another pup eluded us. With winter coming, we struggled to decide how to give these marmots, especially the breeding age female, the best survival chance possible. In the end we made the decision to release the father back to the cutblock with a transmitter that would enable us to track him and his family again in the spring. This meant that we could follow up as early as possible in the spring to get them out.

This year, by tracking the transmitter, our crew was able to find the marmots in the spring snow. Our veterinarian, Malcolm McAdie, with crew members Norberto and Steve, snowshoed in and captured the mother. We’ll return once a bit more snow has melted to capture the father and other pup. Malcolm, Norberto, and Steve hiked the mother out – not an easy task with a marmot on your back! She will be released to a marmot colony later this summer, hopefully with her yearling and the father.

By the way, the mother is the first marmot to be named this year. First on our name-a-marmot winners list was Vanna. Given where she was recovered from, we have dubbed her Vanna Knight!

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May the 4th be with you!

Happy Star Wars Day! May the 4th be with you. Last year, the Calgary Zoo named the young marmots to be released after Stars Wars characters, and boy have some of them been on adventures worthy of their names!

In the oops department: Han Solo… well, lets just say mistakes were made, and Han Solo has been redubbed Hanna Solo! She’s still in hibernation on Mt Washington, but marmots are just starting to get more active.

“Luke, I am your… brother?” Of course, these marmots are all the same generation, so Anakin is actually Luke’s brother, not father! Speaking of Luke….

As Yoda said “Luke, you must not go”, but did Luke listen? No, of course not, and neither did our Luke. After being released in Strathcona Park, we lost track of him. Fortunately, Luke was spotted in November, but to our surprise, he was well outside the Park, far from home or safety. We were able to rescue him, but given how late in the season it was, he could not be released back to the wild. Instead, he spent the winter hibernating in the marmot facility on Mt Washington, and will be released to the wild again this summer.

Next time, can we name the marmots something less adventurous?

Han, oops, Hanna Solo on release day in 2016 at Mt Washington

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From Hedgehogs to Marmots: Young supporters inspire us with their efforts!

We would to extend a special thank you to young people who are helping recover the Vancouver Island Marmot. Your stories and efforts are inspiring! Today we’d like share such two stories that we received.
The first comes from Cohen, age 8, who was doing a project on Hedgehogs at his Comox Valley school that included a fundraising component. Cohen wanted his fundraising efforts to have a local impact, so he decided to raise funds for the Vancouver Island Marmots. What a great example of thinking global and acting local! Thank you Cohen.
Sometimes though, it works the other way around! Despite being on vacation England, our Field Coordinator Cheyney couldn’t help but talk about marmots. After returning home, Cheyney was delighted to get the letter below from Holly-Kathleen, who was clearly moved by Cheyney’s work to recover the marmots! Thank you to both Cohen and Holly-Kathleen, and to everyone, young and old, who supports our work. It is because of your gifts that we are able to make the recovery of this unique species possible!
 
 
 

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Pup Boxing!

Like like us, marmot siblings fight constantly! This type of play teaches the marmots fine motor skills, and likely social behaviours too, such as how to ask for space. These pups were recorded by one of our Field Crew, Joey Chrisholm, in 2016 at Mt Washington. The pups won’t get names until they turn at least one year old, but their mother is Abby, a wild born marmot who has been a great breeder. We need more like her to help the species recover!

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Groundhog Day 2017: What does the Marmot say?

Happy Groundhog Day! According to the CBC, the “western” Groundhogs are saying “more winter.” But we here at the Marmot Recovery Foundation have consulted closely with our “groundhogs”, which are certainly the most western in Canada, and we beg to differ.

For the record, Groundhogs are Marmots. Usually the term “Groundhog” is applied to Monax monax, a widespread species of marmot in North America, and a relative of our Vancouver Island Marmot (Monax vancouverensis). But both species of marmot have a variety of names, including “woodchucks” and “whistle pigs.”

With the educational bit out of the way, just what did the most western marmot of all have to say?

Mostly “zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz” we’re afraid. Vancouver Island Marmots are still very much in hibernation this time of year. It will likely be another two months before they begin emerge from their burrows. Until then, they will only wake up briefly once every two weeks to have a quick bathroom break. Even then, they will not leave their burrow, and there is no light in the burrow, and therefore no shadows.

Of course, we need a prediction from our furry weather prognosticators! The only trouble is in interpreting the data. We are choosing “early spring”. After all, the marmots did not see their shadows, because there is no way they could! Plus, early spring sounds like more fun.

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Beautiful photo Alena! It was a great pleasure to have you join us, and we very much looking forward to seeing more of your photos! ... See MoreSee Less

Sneak peek! I am so pleased to be able to share this photo with you all. Vancouver Island Marmots are endemic to only a few mountains on Vancouver Island (found nowhere else on earth!). 15 years ago,...

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Mixed news today. At Haley Ecological Reserve, we lost 4 marmots to a predator. 😓 We'll be examining the remains to learn what we can. We know that marmots are prey for a number of animals, and this is part of nature. Of course, it is hard to lose any marmots, but it has still been a good year for them overall.

That is in evidence at Mt Washington today, where researcher Megan Wilkins caught this pup peaking out at her. Thanks for brightening our day Megan!
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Our wandering Vancouver Island marmot is on the move again. Alan was found at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre in 2015. For the record, Bamfield is a long way from our marmot's typical mountain habitat. With the help of staff and students, we successfully relocated Alan to a nice colony on Green Mountain.

Alan, however, had other ideas. Over the past 2 summers, he has taken quite the tour of the Nanaimo Lakes marmot colonies, and led our staff on a merry chase. He fooled us again this summer. We were sure he had *finally* settled down. But no. He is on the move again! At least he is staying in typical marmot habitat, which is great.

Keep being you Alan, just stay safe out there. One day you'll find that perfect marmot and settle down. Please?
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