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Updates from the Team

Marmot Recovery Foundation mourns death of Jim Walker

It is with great sadness that we announce that Jim Walker, our Board Chair, passed away unexpectedly on June 20th, 2017. Jim was a tireless advocate for nature, having held many senior government position, including the Assistant Deputy Minister in charge of Fish, Wildlife and Habitat Protection, and Director of Wildlife. After his retirement, Jim continued to volunteer his time and expertise as a Board Member of the Marmot Recovery Foundation and the Nature Trust of BC.

Jim has been the Foundation’s Board Chair since 2006, and we will miss his steady leadership and gentle guidance. Jim had a special place in his heart for the marmots, and spent countless hours volunteering in the recovery effort.

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Good Overwinter Survival for marmots

While it is still early in the year for marmots, our survey results so far have been positive.  Overwinter survival for the marmots has been high, particularly among breeding aged females. This is exactly what we hope to find at this time of year.  Later in the summer when pups start to emerge, we will be looking for signs of reproduction – that is to say active pups. We have feeders out at a number of colonies, which we believe may help the marmots reproduce more frequently.  Our fingers are crossed that lots of those breeding-aged females have litters!

Many people have been asking about the weather. Vancouver Island has had a particular cold and wet spring, which followed a cold winter! However, it does not seem to have had any negative impact on the marmots. In fact, weather station data suggests that after a few mild alpine springs, this year’s alpine weather was closer to the historic norm.

While there is a lot of work ahead of us this year, this is good news for the start of the season!

 

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Marmots emerging from hibernation

Vancouver Island marmots are emerging from their winter hibernation. As often happens, some marmots emerge earlier than others, and many wake up briefly only to return to torpor for some time. Weather conditions in Vancouver Island’s alpine are within normal ranges for this time of year – that includes a fair amount of snow covering the ground.

Marmots are herbivores, with a wide ranging diet of leaves, grasses, shrubs, and even tree bark, and they are able to find food even with snow covering the ground. However, at several colonies, our field crews have set up feeders to provide the marmots with supplementary food. This extra, high quality food may help breeding age females improve their body condition quickly – and perhaps reproduce more often than normally would. 

Waking up from hibernation is an important and challenging time for the Vancouver Island marmot.  Their long winter sleep takes a toll on their bodies, and to recover from hibernation takes even more energy. The BBC produced an excellent segment on this challenge for their show ‘Animals: The Inside Story’

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Our first marmot rescue of the season is complete!

Late last year, we learned of a family of Vancouver Island marmots that established themselves near Knight Lake. We knew from past experience that they would not survive long low elevation, unsuitable habitat and sought to capture and relocate them. We were able to catch two pups and the father, but the mother and another pup eluded us. With winter coming, we struggled to decide how to give these marmots, especially the breeding age female, the best survival chance possible. In the end we made the decision to release the father back to the cutblock with a transmitter that would enable us to track him and his family again in the spring. This meant that we could follow up as early as possible in the spring to get them out.

This year, by tracking the transmitter, our crew was able to find the marmots in the spring snow. Our veterinarian, Malcolm McAdie, with crew members Norberto and Steve, snowshoed in and captured the mother. We’ll return once a bit more snow has melted to capture the father and other pup. Malcolm, Norberto, and Steve hiked the mother out – not an easy task with a marmot on your back! She will be released to a marmot colony later this summer, hopefully with her yearling and the father.

By the way, the mother is the first marmot to be named this year. First on our name-a-marmot winners list was Vanna. Given where she was recovered from, we have dubbed her Vanna Knight!

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May the 4th be with you!

Happy Star Wars Day! May the 4th be with you. Last year, the Calgary Zoo named the young marmots to be released after Stars Wars characters, and boy have some of them been on adventures worthy of their names!

In the oops department: Han Solo… well, lets just say mistakes were made, and Han Solo has been redubbed Hanna Solo! She’s still in hibernation on Mt Washington, but marmots are just starting to get more active.

“Luke, I am your… brother?” Of course, these marmots are all the same generation, so Anakin is actually Luke’s brother, not father! Speaking of Luke….

As Yoda said “Luke, you must not go”, but did Luke listen? No, of course not, and neither did our Luke. After being released in Strathcona Park, we lost track of him. Fortunately, Luke was spotted in November, but to our surprise, he was well outside the Park, far from home or safety. We were able to rescue him, but given how late in the season it was, he could not be released back to the wild. Instead, he spent the winter hibernating in the marmot facility on Mt Washington, and will be released to the wild again this summer.

Next time, can we name the marmots something less adventurous?

Han, oops, Hanna Solo on release day in 2016 at Mt Washington

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Marmot Recovery Foundation

Spot the Marmot! (this one is very hard).

A bit of backstory to this photo: we received a report of a Vancouver Island Marmot on a residential property on Saturday. Field Coordinator Mike Lester went out to have a look and found this frightened guy hanging out in the woodshed. Mike was able to trap the marmot, and transport him to the Tony Barrett Mt Washington Marmot Recovery Centre.

This fellow will be re-released to a colony once he has a clean bill of health.

He is easy to spot once Mike caught him, but see if you can find the marmot's fur in the first photo.
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Happy Father's Day to all our Marmot Dads! Vancouver Island Marmot fathers play an important role in rearing pups. They play guard and teach socialization skills to the energetic youngsters.

We still have another few weeks before we learn who is mom and dad this year, as the young marmots will not emerge from the burrow until early July, but we're hoping for lots of new dads out there!

Thanks to Alena E.S. Conservation & Photography for the photo.
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Field Coordinator Mike Lester spent part of his Sunday catching this Yellow-bellied Marmot that was accidentally transported to Nanaimo. This marmot is now at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Centre waiting for transportation back to the Interior.

Why don't we want marmot tourists on the Island? First, marmots are most likely to thrive in areas where there are others of their species. Second, we don't want to transmit diseases between marmots species that would not normally encounter each other.

Just how are these Yellow-bellied Marmots getting to the Island? We don't know for sure, but we suspect they arrive in construction materials and large hay bales that may look like good burrows. Once these items start to move, the marmot may just hunker down for the ride. Another possibility is that they crawl into the underside of cars, which Yellow-bellied Marmots are known to do. Again, they may just hunker down until the end of the trip.

Regardless of whether it is a Vancouver Island Marmot or Yellow-bellied, if you see a marmot on Vancouver Island, let us know!
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