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Updates from the Team

December’s Marmot of the Month: Rudy

Meet Rudy, December’s Marmot of the Month. Are we going stretch to make a holiday theme by suggesting “Rudy” is short for “Rudolph”? You bet we are!

Aside from his name, Rudy resembles Rudolph in a three important ways.

First, there are, mysteriously, no photos of Rudy. We had him in hand one time back in 2016, and we’ve seen glimpses and signs, but he has deftly evaded all our camera traps! That sounds familiar….

Second, his name breaks the rhyming scheme of all his kin. At Rudy’s home on Moriarty Mountain, all the marmots names rhyme with “Forest”. There’s Rudy’s suspected mate Chloris, not to mention Morris, Horris, Borris, and Dolores. (Why the rhyming name scheme? The Field Crew gave them these names to irritate Don, our retired Field Coordinator, who felt that marmot names shouldn’t sound too similar. You see what we’re dealing with?)

Third, Rudy is definitely showing the way for his species. He may not have a red-nose, but we strongly suspect that he and Chloris have been busy making pups at Moriarty, which is one of the most successful Vancouver Island marmot colonies. More than that, Moriarty is a particularly steep, rugged site, and Rudy excels at climbing in the cliffs, showing his pups and the other marmots how to stay safe from predators!

Right now, Rudy is hibernating. His burrow, more than 2 meters underground, is safe and dry, unaffected by yesterday’s storm. We look forward to seeing him again next spring though!

Happy holidays everyone!

This is not Rudy, but an untagged marmot mom and one of her pups earlier this year at Moriarty.

That cliff and the steep bowl below is Rudy’s home. Not an easy place to get into!

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November’s Marmot of the Month: Lucky Lucy

November’s  Marmot of the Month is Lucky Lucy, who truly has lived up to her name. Lucky was born in the wild at Gemini Mountain in 2016.  For the past 2 years, she seemed to be doing great, and all indications were that soon there would be another breeding age female wild marmot.

Then, this year, Lucky’s story seemed to take a dark turn. Crew couldn’t see Lucky on their visit to Gemini, but her telemetry signal was weak and reading “slow”. At the time, we interpreted the signal to mean that she had died, though we noted that the signal was unusual. After that, nothing. We couldn’t find her signal at all.

That all changed in late August though, when on a trip to another colony nearby, the crew aimed the telemetry antenna across the valley, just to see if another angle would pick up Lucky’s signal. Against all odds, not only was her signal strong, but it was clearly “fast” – indicating she was alive and well! Since then, she’s been detected alive and well a couple more times, right where we left her on the top of Gemini Mountain.

Why did Lucky’s signal throw us for a loop? We will never know for sure, but rock walls can play havoc with telemetry signals bouncing them in odd ways. It is possible that Lucky ventured down off Gemini for a while, or perhaps she had dug a burrow under a particularly large rock.

Regardless, we feel fortunate to have her back! 

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Giving Thanks

Happy Thanksgiving to all our American friends! While we celebrated a little earlier here in Canada, it’s always worth taking the opportunity to express our thanks to the people who are making it possible to save the marmots. This species is here today thanks to you.

Our work to save the Vancouver Island Marmot has only been possible thanks to the gifts of donors and the support of partners. Our partners include the Calgary and Toronto Zoos, whose expertise, facilities, and research support have been critical. Landowners TimberWest, Island Timberlands, and Mount Washington Alpine Resort have provided funding, donated land, and created new parks to protect the marmot’s habitat. The Province of BC has provided operating support, office space, and field equipment like trucks to make our work possible.

And our donors’ gifts have provided the financial support to pay the bills, and hire the exceptional, dedicated crew we need to get these marmots back into their wild habitat.

Together, you are showing that Canadians and the World care about our most vulnerable species and that, with work and time, we can save them.

With all our heart, thank you.

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October’s Marmot of the Month: Buffy

“When Witches go riding and black cats are seen, the Moon laughs and whispers, ‘tis near Halloween” – Author unknown.

Needing comfort from the restless dead haunting your dreams? Does your heart need lightening during the dark of All Hallows’ Eve? Then relief we bring, because Buffy is here!

Buffy may not appear to fit the standard mould of monster slayer, being somewhat smaller and furrier than her more famous TV namesake. Can this small and unassuming marmot be a secret monster masher?

Consider this: Buffy lives in the wild Mount Washington colony, where, coincidentally, there are the fewest predators of all our marmot colonies. Is it because of Buffy? Do cougars and wolves dare not tread these hills due to her furry presence? Perhaps … or perhaps there are other factor at play. All we can say for sure is that we rest easier on the mountain knowing Buffy hibernates somewhere nearby. 

At 7 years old, we hope Buffy has a few more years of keeping the forces of evil at bay before she passes the mantle on, perhaps to one of the pups she has nurtured along the way.

Photo by Jordan Cormack. Wooden stake added for … illustrative …. purposes only. 

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Canada Post Strike Update: We will get your donations!

We want to assure you that your mail will reach us, despite the current limited job action at Canada Post. As you may have heard, Canada Post has begun rotating strikes, including here on Vancouver Island. The job action may impact how long it takes your mail to reach us, and vice versa, but mail will still be delivered.

Alternatively, you can give to us online at https://marmots.org/how-you-can-help/donate-now/, or phone us at 250 390-0006 – we do love to chat with you about your marmots!

Your gifts are reason we are able to continue the marmots’ recovery. Thank you all so much for supporting this special animal and our work to save it. 

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